The Ultimate Guide on How to Become a Tutor

Tutoring is the best job I’ve ever had. It has been the most rewarding, flexible, highest paying (per hour), and fun job ever-yes, including my “real” day job. Throughout the years, I’ve been asked constantly about how to become a tutor. At first, I was hesitant to share my secrets to success. After all, teaching others how to become a successful tutor would only give me competition.

Silly, right?

It’s not like I could tutor every student in the world… or even in my city!

So I decided to post this guide on how to become a tutor. Whether you’re a parent trying to make some extra income, or a student hoping to make some spending money, this guide will be one one-stop-shop for setting up your tutoring business.

I’m laying it all out on the table in the hopes of helping some of you, my readers, succeed with this amazing job, that could very well turn into a career.

Here’s what we’ll be covering. Feel free to click on any chapter in the following table of contents to jump ahead.

How to Become a Tutor: What to Teach

How to Become a Tutor: What to Charge

How to Become a Tutor: Where to Hold Lessons

How to Become a Tutor: Where to Find Students

How to Become a Tutor: Offering Families Bonuses

How to Become a Tutor: A Great One!

How to Become a Tutor: Staying Safe on the Job

How to Become a Tutor: Expanding Your Empire

How to Become a Tutor: The Ups of Being a Tutor

How to Become a Tutor: The Downs of Being a Tutor

 

So grab yourself a snack and mug of your favorite drink, because it’s going to be a looooooooong one!

 

And be sure to download a PDF version of this post for later reference.

How to Become a Tutor: What to Teach?

The first step in becoming a tutor is, of course, deciding what you’re going to teach. There are tons of different ways you can go about this, and each have their pros and cons. You can choose to market yourself by the age group you specialize in (such as elementary school students), or choose a specific subject and go across multiple age levels (such as math from Algebra 1 to Calculus). I couldn’t possibly include every possibility, so I’ll cover my top recommendations.

Math

Math is, without a doubt, the subject I’ve had the most students in, and as a specialty for tutoring, it definitely has it’s perks.

Highest Demand

In my experience, math is the subject with the highest demand for tutors. By far. No matter who you talk to, it seems like most adults think back on their math classes with dread. And students make faces and groan when you bring up the subject. It is, single-handedly the subject that brings the most pain to students. Don’t get me wrong. The sciences are difficult for students too. But no subject is quite like math in the sense that your college classes will still be building on the addition you learned in Kindergarten.

And parents know this, which is why they are more likely to reach out for help when their kiddo is falling behind in math, versus Earth and Space Science, for example.

Highest Longevity per Student

Math also has the highest longevity per student. Once a child is caught up to their age appropriate reading level, chances are they’ll be able to stay on track moving forward.

This is not necessarily the case when it comes to math. Even if you give a child intensive tutoring and they build up the foundation they were missing, they may still struggle in upcoming years, since math courses only become more difficult. Therefore, math students in your client list are more likely to stay with you for multiple years than their reading or foreign language counterparts.

Test prep

If you’re well rounded and have tested well in the past, potential clients are willing to pay more for exam prep than single-subject lessons. Nearly anything is fair game for marketing yourself as a Test Prep tutor:

  • state-specific yearly exams,
  • Advanced Placement (AP),
  • International Baccalaureate (IB),
  • SAT,
  • ACT,
  • GRE,
  • MCAT,
  • Bar Exam
  • Career-specific test prep

Hobbies and Foreign Language

This area can be a bit tricky. There’s definitely less need (and parents have less budget) for hobby-type in-home lessons such as music, sporting coaches, or foreign language.

However!

Parents that do want to pay for these types of lessons for their children are typically willing to pay more per hour for it. Therefore, having these unique specialties in your arsenal means you can charge more.

Next, is the obvious question that even I struggle with sometimes: what do you charge?

 

How to Become a Tutor: What to Charge?

This is one of the biggest questions regarding how to become a tutor. It seems like this is every single tutor’s stress point: what in the world should I charge? And it’s an incredibly important question to ask, and ask again often. You don’t want to overcharge and get zero students, but you also don’t want to sell yourself short. Although there is no right or wrong answer to this question, there are definitely a few criteria you should keep in mind when pricing your lessons.

Your education level

Are you in high school?

College?

Graduated and in the field?

PhD?!

It goes without saying that the more education you’ve obtained, the more you can charge for your services. That is because parents want what is best for their children. And typically, “best” often has several degrees hanging up on the wall.

It may not be fair, but it’s the mentality that many parents have.

So if you have higher education, be sure to mention it and you’ll see that parents see you as being more “valuable” once they know it.

Do you have a Master’s degree or PhD related to the field you’re tutoring?

Bear with me, because even though it sounds pretty similar to my previous point, it’s not what you’re thinking.

Higher education is definitely a good selling point. But what is an even better selling point is if your degree is somehow related to the subject you’re teaching, or teaching in general.

I have a college friend who is charging $80 per hour for his tutoring lessons, despite living in a less populated area and not having much experience in tutoring.

So how does he do it?

He’s a certified teacher!

I have a graduate degree and certification in Behavior Analysis, which is the science of understanding and modifying behavior.

This works perfectly for me because it allows me to target as clients students with unique learning needs such as Autism, Asperger’s, and ADHD.

Big city vs Suburbia

The bigger the city you tutor in, the more you can get away with charging. Smaller cities and towns however, tend to have a lower average income and therefore a lower cost of living, so it’s harder for parents to justify paying excessively high tutoring rates.

How long have you been tutoring?

I’ll keep this one short and sweet because it’s pretty straight forward. The longer you’ve been tutoring, the more you can charge. It means you have more experience in 1:1 teaching, and experience is worth paying a premium for.

In person vs online lessons

You can argue this one in either direction, depending on how you pitch it to families.

On one hand, in-person lessons cost more to you as the instructor. You can typically charge more since you have to account for commute time, and gas and wear on your vehicle (or paying for transportation).

On the other hand, providing online lessons can be pitched as a bonus for families, since the scheduling can be more flexible – sometimes even at a moment’s notice.

What you’re teaching

Parents are willing to pay more for some subjects than others. It’s just the truth.

The STEM subjects (science, technology, engineering, and math) will generally earn you bigger bucks, since students tend to do very poorly in them.

Sports and the arts, unfortunately, are typically not as valued by parents – or schools. This means that unless a family has the money for extra curricular activities, these won’t open you up to many high-paying clients.

Expanded empire vs WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get)

We’ll go more in-depth on expanded empires a bit later on in this article but just know that it’s a big deal for you as well as clients.

The more value you can offer your student and their family, the more easily you can justify charging them a premium per hour. Added resources through an expanded empire will help parents feel like they are truly getting their money’s worth, since they are getting you 1:1 for lessons, as well as all your knowledge even when you aren’t there.

And if a family is on the fence between hiring you or another tutor, sometimes the extra resources will help you earn a new student!

Niche vs General

This is a great category because it can work for you both ways–as long as you can explain the benefits to the family. 😉

The Pros to Being a Niche Tutor

Tutors with a very particular specialty have typically invested the time to truly become an expert in that subject.

If you only teach AP Calculus, parents will feel like they are getting someone who truly knows the subject inside and out. This will make them feel more comfortable in paying you a higher rate to tutor their child.

The Pros to Being a Generalist Tutor

The benefit to being a generalist tutor is that you can offer families help across all subjects. Great students who are only struggling in one subject are less common than kiddos with overall poor study habits struggling across the board.

If you are a niche tutor, the family would have to hire multiple tutors to meet their child’s academic needs. They might also cancel more lessons, since kids need differing levels of help in a single subject in any given week.

Being a generalist means that you can be the family’s one-stop-shop tutor. You can help the kiddo in their math lessons, reading, handwriting, and science experiement.

My personal process on choosing what to charge

At the end of the day, choosing what to charge is something that will be a bit (or a lot) of trial and error for everyone. I have a very specific process I personally go through when pricing lessons.

How I Price My Lessons

When I was in high school, I started off charging $20 per hour. I bumped up my rate to $30-40 while I was in college and graduate school tutoring in the suburbs. Now I  have students in the $60-70 range because I:

  • tutor in the outskirts of Los Angeles,
  • have a Master’s degree in a related field,
  • am constantly expanding my empire,
  • am a generalist,
  • have been tutoring for 12+ years

Although all those points might suggest to you that I might be able to charge even more than $60-$70, a bit more goes into my process than just my strengths.  After all, my skills and expertise don’t exist in a bubble!

Not only do I have that specific pricing method, but I also reassess my pricing constantly.

How I Reassess my Pricing

There are several key times when I will reassess what I am charging students:

  • when I am contacted by a new student,
  • if my schedule is full,
  • or when my schedule is nearly empty.

Each time I am contacted by a new student, I will generally bump up my price by $10 to account for inflation and while finding the pricing sweet spot for my skills and the area.

When my schedule is nearly full, I bump up by $15 for new students. Like any other business, tutoring should take supply and demand into consideration. When demand for your expertise is high (and supply, i.e. your time, is low), your hourly rate should increase accordingly.

On the flip side, when my schedule is nearly empty and I want to give it a little boost, I’ll drop my rate $10 from my highest-paying student. I haven’t had to do this in several years, since I’ve long since found my sweet spot, but it is something that I do on occasion.

Now that you have your hourly rate, let’s discuss possible lesson venues.

 

How to Become a Tutor: Where to Hold Lessons?

There are so many options for places to hold lessons! As long as the parents are OK with it, feel free to switch it up with the changing seasons.

Child’s home

This will, more often than not, be your go-to lesson location. It’s most convenient for parents, since they can make dinner or get work done during the lesson. And, given your other options, it’s also most convenient for you, since you don’t have to hope for an empty table at Starbucks or the library.

However, some families won’t be comfortable with giving their address out to someone they don’t know, and they have a point! Therefore, sometimes the student’s home won’t be an option available to you. The more options you have to suggest to the family, the more comfortable they will feel.

Public library

Public libraries are hit or miss for many reasons, though they definitely come in handy when you’re in a pinch. If your student is easily distracted, this might not be the best option, unless study skills and focusing on work is something the parent specifically wants you to focus on.

They also might not be ideal when holidays come around, since they may reduce their hours of operation. However, it’s definitely a great option, and one I’ve used (and continue to use) with much success with several students at multiple different libraries.

Public park

I’ve never personally tutored at a park, but I imagine it could be quite nice! Scope out the park before your first session to make sure there are tables you can use to maintain a structure and posture conducive to learning. As long as the parents are ok with it, it might be a great option for the spring and summer months.

Local college campus

Back in 2011, I had one student, C, who’s mom was willing to drive her to my college campus 30 minutes away from their home so I could tutor her between my classes.

It was a time in my life when my schedule was full to the brim:

  • I had an 18 credit undergraduate courseload,
  • multiple extracurricular activities,
  • and 10 tutoring students weekly.

I was swamped.

I had tutored C in her home years before in math, but now she was older and needing help in her high school physics class. So her mom would drop her off at my college’s library, we would have our lesson for an hour, and then she would be picked up and I would go off to my next class.

C has since graduated high school and college as well.

I want you to keep this in mind as an example of how loyal your families can be if you give them high-quality tutoring lessons.

Local coffeehouse

I’ve tutored at Starbucks and The Coffee Bean locations before, and it can be  quite nice!

The pro, of course, is being able to grab a quick snack or coffee before the lesson starts!

Keep in mind, however, that you may not always be able to find a table available.

Your home

This is the least likely option, so I won’t go into too much detail here. If the parents choose this option, be sure to maintain your standard level of  professionalism. Dress as you would to tutor at the child’s home, don’t eat through the lesson, or complete unrelated chores.

Provide parents with a space to wait or supervise if they wish.

Rent a tutoring location

Of course this is a possibility, but I find that the cons far outweigh the pros. Even though it’ll cut down on commuting and appear more professional, parents are less likely to prefer a location other than the convenience of lessons in their home. And do I even need to state the obvious: it can be expensive to rent a location!!

But don’t feel bad if you’re working hard and still not making enough to rent a small office space: I make a decent income from my tutoring, and I even I don’t rent a location.

Now that we’ve covered what to teach, where to do it, and what to charge, how about the most critical part: where to find students?

 

How to Become a Tutor: Where to Find Students?

Believe it or not, finding students isn’t actually as hard as you might think! The key is in getting the first two or three students. From there on, if you’re good at what you do, the referrals can start snowballing in pretty quickly!

Neighbors

Tutoring your neighbors’ kids is a great start. Not only is there no commute to consider, but you probably already have some sort of relationship with them so you’re not starting a relationship with a family from scratch.

My first paid student was my next door neighbor, E, back when I was in high school and only charging $20. She was very bright and studious, and my memories of her certainly serve as a reminder of how long I’ve been tutoring, since she had her high school prom about a year ago!

Family, Friends, and Family Friends

Tutoring family and friends might be hit or miss. However, it can be a great starting point if you’ve never tutored before, so I would be remiss if I didn’t discuss the option.

Tutoring family and friends is a great idea since they tend to be our biggest fans. 🙂 They are usually our biggest cheerleaders, rooting for our success.

However.

The downside to tutoring family and friends is that they sometimes want a “family and friends” discount.

Since offering a discounted rate to get the ball rolling is a great way to start getting your name out here, you can minimize this downside by telling them that that is a special rate for them and that they shouldn’t quote it to others when recommending you. That way you won’t be held to this lower rate when taking on students they recommend you to.

Phone apps

There are plenty of websites and phone applications where you can make a tutor account and post your profile. I’ve personally only used two of them, so I’ll talk about them here.

Wyzant

Wyzant is a great place to find tutoring students, since there are many parents using the app daily. They pay you fairly often, which is great, and you can also set your own hourly rate. It does, however, have a few downsides.

First or all, it takes a bit of effort to set up your account. For each subject you want to teach, you have to either take and pass a quiz they provide, or write a few sentences on why you are qualified to teach that subject.

Second, they pay you on a sliding scale depending on how many hours you’ve tutored for them. When you’re first starting out, they will withhold 35% of your hourly rate. That’s quite a huge chunk of cash!

The more hours you teach through their app, however, the smaller the percent they will deduct, so logging more hours with them is beneficial if you plan on staying in their structure for some time.

Care.com

Care.com is a website where people can hire many different sorts of help, including nannies, babysitters, tutors, senior care, etc. Even though I have used (and gotten clients through) Care.com, to be honest, I didn’t enjoy my experience very much.

When a parent posts a job, they include what they are willing to pay per hour. The problem with this is that, in my experience, people on the site don’t generally value a tutor’s experience.

Most posts for tutors hover at about $10-20/hour or so. And others are even less reasonable than that.

For example, I’ve seen posts requesting tutors with experience teaching special needs children as low as $15/hour!

Teaching special needs children can often require very specialized knowledge and expertise. Requesting to pay a maximum of $15/hour is simply unreasonable!

Ok. Rant over. 🙂

Word of mouth

This is my favorite aspect of how to become a tutor! Once you’ve landed your first couple of students, word of mouth will be your best friend when it comes to landing new students! Studies show that people are more likely to make a purchase when it’s been recommended by a friend, it’s basic social proof! Even though they aren’t exactly “purchasing” you, the idea still stands. It’s better to hire a tutor that comes recommended by someone you know, than to have to do your own search and potentially hire someone inadequate.

Talk to local schools

Another good option is to foster relationships with schools near you. Set up a meeting with an administrator and discuss the relationship you would like to build with their campus. Ask if you can leave flyers at their front office. Or perhaps there is a procedure for working with them in a more formal way.

This is a great way to ensure you always have a steady stream of students, since there will always be kiddos coming in from younger grade levels.

Business cards

There’s a lot of debate around the use of business cards nowadays. Many feel that cell phones have rendered the typical business card obsolete.

I bed to differ.

If you design yourself a truly eye-catching business card, it can be a great ice breaker out on the town whenever you meet someone new. It will also help your current students give you referrals if they have a card to hand over.

Include the areas within your driving radius, as well as any other information a family might use to learn more about you, such as your blog or social media (more on that later).

Vendor with a nearby charter school

I’m not sure if this is a nationwide procedure, but in California, private tutors can become vendored with local charter schools to tutor their students.

Vendoring with a school is a great idea, since parents can still hire the tutor they want (i.e. YOU!) but the bill gets passed on to the school.

This is a bit more involved of a process, since you’ll have to submit to a background check and receive a w-9 or 1099 tax form from the school.

However, having a charter school as one of your clients increases your legitimacy, and knowing that you are able to passing a background check will always be a comfort to families.

Post up flyers

If you can design (or hire someone to do it for you) yourself an eye-catching flyer, there are many places you can ask about posting it. Some options for places where you can leave your flyers in your community for people to come across include:

  • Pediatricians offices
  • Pediatric dentistry offices
  • Coffeehouses near schools
  • Hair salons tailored to children

Website

Admittedly, a website alone will not bring you many clients. It requires quite a bit of promotion on your part, and ranking on Google is near impossible without implementing a serious strategy.

However, including a few pages will definitely make your onboarding process easier.

  • An About Me page will help parents get to know you. You can include a bit about yourself personally, as well as your credentials and experience.
  • A Testimonials page will make it easy for you to have a  go-to response if a family asks you for references.
  • A structured page with your rules and procedures will minimize miscommunication regarding your cancellation process, holiday schedules, and confirmation procedures before lessons.

Adding a page with a survey you can give parents will help you gather testimonials from students and their families.

I’m so glad you’re still with me! Grab yourself a refill and let’s keep going. 🙂

Tea with flowers

 

How to Become a Tutor: Offering Families Bonuses?

Sometimes a student will be a great fit for you, your schedule, and your commute.

They’re adorable and you can’t wait to teach them.

You HAVE to have them in your classload!

But the parents are just too hesitant about your hourly rate.

Has this ever happened to you?

At this point, there are many different bonuses you can offer a family to sweeten the deal without selling your soul and undercharging for your time and expertise.

Discount for multi-hour sessions

Multi-hour lessons are my favorite for many reasons (I even wrote a blog post about my ideal lesson that you can read here). Mainly, multi hour lessons will help the student feel less rushed during their learning. They also give you more time to get to know their needs and learning styles.

Multi-hour sessions are best for you if the student lives far, since you can get more out of that commute.

They’re also great if the parents want you to teach their siblings as well, since it saves you having to schedule time on another day and make the same drive.

Just keep in mind that younger students will not be able to stay as attentive through a longer session, so offer them short breaks and be more patient towards the end than you were at the beginning.

Discount for multiple sessions per week

This is a good option if the student lives closer to you (to minimize commuting) or if there are siblings you’ll be teaching separately.

Multiple sessions per week are great for parents that want more help for their child but the kiddo is too young (or has special needs) and can’t sit through a multi-hour lesson.

Discounts for referrals

This is my favorite bonus to offer!

Why? Because it’s the bonus that keeps on giving! Not only does it mean a new student knows about you, but now that’s potentially several whole new audiences you can expand to. That new parent’s social circle, the student’s social circle, and if there’s a sibling, even better!

Remember, word of mouth will always be your best friend. Be generous and make a referral worth your family’s time.

10th lesson free?

I’ve never actually seen this done, but as long as you keep accurate count of your lessons, this can potentially be a great way to keep students coming back to you.

Extra text message/email availability

I offered this to one student years ago and it worked out pretty well for us. A’s parents and I agreed to a maximum of two additional questions through the week, aside from our weekly lessons.

So between lessons, A was able to email or text me a picture of the question he was struggling on. I would either solve the problem showing the work step by step and send it back, or type out some hints and instructions to help him along the way.

It allowed me more flexibility in the value I was providing families, and allowed them to get some quick help that might not necessarily require a full additional lesson.

Discount for group lessons

Group lessons are a great way to offer families a discount without selling yourself short. For example, you can charge $40/kid for 1:1 lessons or $30/kid for groups. Even though each family is paying less for an hour of your time, you actually come out ahead because you’re charging two separate families.

Group lessons simply make better use of your time. Aside from that increased rate/hour, group lessons save you the second student’s hour so you can give it to another student. They also save you time spent commuting and gas for your vehicle.

 

How to Become a Tutor: A Great One!

Before a Lesson

  • Give families value. Being giving and flexible will help parents see you as an indispensable asset for their child’s education.
  • But also value your own time. This will save you from burnout and being taken advantage of.
  • Review material before the lesson. Think about any tips or metaphors you can use to explain the lesson better.
  • Stay organized and be prepared. Have a planner you use to keep track of your lessons and availability. Always have paper, extra pencils and an eraser.

During the Lesson

  • Be professional with parents. Dress professionally and speak properly.
  • Structure will help students stay on task, but don’t forget to be patient.
  • Don’t be afraid to be relatable. Opening up to R about my panic over organic chemistry helped him feel supported and he was able to see that he was not alone in the experience.
  • If a kiddo is distracted, don’t be afraid to ask them what’s wrong. A 5 minute break spent discussing a student’s unrelated problem can save you from an awkward, frustrated, and inefficient hour. I remember the day that I was tutoring C and she was just completely out of it. She was getting even the simplest of questions wrong. I took 5 minutes to just be her friend (during which she told me her boyfriend had broken up with her) and then she was in a much better place to be productive with me.
  • Make lessons fun as well as educational. As a tutor, you are a key part of teaching students what learning is about. It’s up to you whether learning can be something enjoyable for your student or just an extension of their unhappy school day.

My Ultimate KEY!

  • My ultimate key to being a great and memorable tutor: remember your kiddo’s birthday! Take them a card or small candy bar (with the family’s permission of course) and take a minute or two to ask them how they’ll be celebrating it. This special touch will make the kiddo love you, and the family feel like you truly care for their child.

It’s not all about money and students, however. One of your top priorities should be staying safe.

 

How to Become a Tutor: Staying Safe on the Job

  • At least until you get to know the family, schedule the first couple of lessons at public places.
  • Let someone know the address of where you will be and the approximate time you’re expected to be out of the lesson.
  • if you had to park far from the lesson location, be aware of where you’re parking the car. That way you won’t have to wander around after the lesson searching for it.
  • Leave if you feel uncomfortable.
  • Be sure to fill up the gas tank prior to a lesson, so you’re not stranded in an area you don’t know looking for a gas station.
  • Even if you’re on the road nonstop between lessons, be sure to keep a meal schedule or keep snacks with you. Low blood sugar can impair your judgement and make driving unsafe.

You are ROCKING it! I’m so glad you’re still with me, I warned you it would be a looong one! 😉

 

How to Become a Tutor: Expanding Your Empire

There’s several reasons why it’s often difficult to tutor full-time:

  • the narrow after-school schedule,
  • having to drive to each location cuts into your already small window of oppotunity,
  • the typical session is a short 1-hour increment,
  • and parents sometimes want summer, winter, and spring vacations off

So the easiest way to maximize your income from a tutoring business is to stop exchanging your time for money. You do this by expanding your empire through several different avenues.

YouTube lessons

YouTube lessons are great.

First off, you can use it as a new way to get your name out there and find new students. If they found you by searching “factoring polynomials” on YouTube, chances are they may be interested in hiring a tutor!

Second, if you have enough traffic on your YouTube channel, you can monetize your traffic directly on the site.

Having a YouTube channel will also increase your value to clients. The best way to grow your client list and your business is to give more than you receive. In the tutoring business, you would do this by providing more resources to families than you receive in payment.

Blogging

Blogging is a similar idea to the YouTube channel above. The key difference is that it relies on your written communication rather than your onscreen oral communication. Personally, I enjoy writing and am pretty video-shy.

So blogging was a natural choice for me.

Blogging will help your tutoring website get more traffic from the internet. Remember, the one with testimonials we mentioned earlier?

It can also be another great way to get your name out there and find students. And like YouTube, if you have enough traffic on your blog, you can monetize your traffic directly on the site.

A blog will also increase your value to clients. Remember, you want to give more value than you receive in payment!

Summer packages

Breaks from school can be a tutor’s worst enemy.

It should be the time when they get more tutoring, right?

  • To prepare for the next year
  • Build on their skills
  • To keep from forgetting everything they’ve learned.

But parents like to cancel during vacations. And I get it.

  • They want to take family trips
  • Or perhaps save some cash.

But that doesn’t change the facts. You should dedicate some serious time to developing summer programs you can offer parents to entice them to stick around. They might even bring you new students!

Preparing for What’s Ahead

Buying exam prep or curriculum books or packets for the grade levels you teach most often may be a great investment if you want to structure summer lessons for a student looking to get ahead.

This way, you can develop a full-length summer 1:1 lesson set or small group bootcamp to prepare for the coming year or upcoming exams like the SATs and ACTs.

Educational Field Trips

This one would definitely be fun! I wish I had tried this when I was living closer to the city.

Developing a summer camp-type program for your student would be a great way to get them out of the house while keeping them mentally stimulated.

Some trips and lessons you can provide include:

  • visiting a science museum and then making a diorama on one topic you learned about
  • packing a picnic and renting books at the local public library to read on your picnic
  • researching art styles, visiting an art museum, and then making your own artwork to mimic that style
  • writing a report on dogs or cats and then volunteering at an animal shelter for a day
  • Sea World with a report on their favorite sea animal
  • researching local plants and animals and then hiking a local park

Create a product to sell

There are countless of possible products you can create, your only limit is your imagination.

  • workbooks
  • writing a book
  • educational games
  • planners
  • online course
  • you can sell membership to an online portal with multiple tools and resources

If you do decide to create a product, I recommend you choose to focus on digital products customers and just download. It will be easier for you to manage and has a significantly lower overhead and barrier of entry.

Create a phone app

If you’re a coder and tech savvy, you can develop an app to accompany your lessons or one of the products listed above.

By developing an app, you can incorporate ads into your app to monetize your app downloads. You can also sell the app as an add-on to your lessons or as a standalone learning system.

Even if they choose not to purchase your app, having one available increases your perceived value to clients.

Online Lessons

Online lessons are a great way to expand your empire. Even though you are still exchanging time for money, online lessons eliminate the time spent commuting between lessons. It also reduces your overhead costs since you won’t be driving as much. Though to be fair, you will have to have reliable internet, so this is still an expense.

Online lessons also expand your empire literally. Providing online lessons means you can now teach people outside of your radius.

Maybe you were driving a 5, 10, or even 30 mile radius for students before?

Now, your only limitation is that the student has a computer and internet access.

Cool huh?

Group lessons

Have I said how much I love group lessons?!

Aside from all the pros I covered earlier, my favorite part about group lessons is that they increase your reach. With group lessons, it’s not only your student that knows about your killer skills. Now your student’s classmates will know about you too. Once those classmates’ parents know about you, they might want lessons for their other child as well.

Just be sure to continue providing very high value in the group setting. It’s very easy to get off-topic when your students are all friends–don’t let this happen!

Hiring subcontractors and outsourcing students

I have had to outsource students in the past due to a lack of availability in my schedule. Unfortunately, it never really worked out. And the reason it didn’t work out is the reason why this is my least liked expansion idea: you have to have people you trust!

Not only people you trust to be responsible, but people with teaching styles compatible with yours. If you are going to suggest this person as someone affiliated with your brand, make sure that they represent you well. If not, you might end up losing referrals and clients.

I couldn’t possibly write the ultimate guide on how to become a tutor without covering all the bright sides of tutoring, now, could !?

 

How to Become a Tutor:  The Ups of Being a Tutor

  • Seeing the lightbulbs go off when your sweet student finally get a topic.
  • Hearing them say “Your explanation makes it sound so easy!”
  • Watching your kiddos grow and succeed.
  • Keeping in touch after you finish teaching them, knowing you helped make their lives better.
  • Realizing you’re a role model to some of these kids, someone they can talk to and relate to.
  • Knowing you are your own boss and running your own business.
  • The ability to set your own schedule.

And if I cover the UPs of tutoring, I also have to be realistic and fill you in on the negative aspects too. I do want you to be a fully informed tutor, after all!

 

How to Become a Tutor: The Downs of Being a Tutor

  • Some kids won’t like you, they may even be pretty rude. Don’t take it personally.
  • Some parents won’t respect your time or value your work enough to pay you your desired rate. Be flexible but know your worth.
  • Each student is a kiddo you know you’ll stop seeing eventually–it can be sad when you get attached.
  • You do a lot of driving. A lot.
  • Some kids have special needs, which may be difficult to work with, if you don’t have experience with unique learners. Be up front with parents about this. They will appreciate your honesty, and it will make your life a lot easier too.
  • The better you do your job, the quicker you’ll lose the student. But if you follow my advice and give it your best, hopefully they refer you to others! That way you’ll be able to keep working.

 

TL;DR

Hopefully this guide on how to become a tutor will be an invaluable tool in turning your casual tutoring into a profitable side business.

And don’t forget to download the printable version so you can refer back to it offline!

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *